Terminology

MRI

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a test that uses a magnetic field and pulses of radio wave energy to make pictures of organs and structures inside the body. In many cases MRI gives different information about structures in the body than can be seen with an X-ray, ultrasound, or computed tomography (CT) scan.

HOW TO PREP FOR AN MRI:
Wear clothing that does not contain metal fasteners. If your exam requires a contrast injection, please wear clothing with short sleeves. Please do not wear jewelry or eye makeup. 

MRI2

 


Catscan

A computed tomography (CT) scan uses X-rays to make detailed pictures of structures inside of the body. During the test, you will lie on a table that is attached to the CT scanner, which is a large doughnut-shaped machine. The CT scanner sends X-rays through the body area being studied. Each rotation of the scanner provides a picture of a thin slice of the organ or area. All of the pictures are saved as a group on a computer. They also can be printed. In some cases, a dye called contrast material may be used. It may be put in a vein (IV) in your arm, or it may be placed into other parts of your body (such as the rectum or a joint) to see those areas better. For some types of CT scans you drink the dye. The dye makes structures and organs easier to see on the CT pictures. A CT scan can be used to study all parts of your body, such as the chest, belly, pelvis, or an arm or leg. It can take pictures of body organs, such as the liverpancreasintestineskidneysbladderadrenal glands,lungs, and heart. It also can study blood vessels, bones, and the spinal cord.

HOW TO PREP FOR A CT WITH CONTRAST INJECTION:
Do not eat anything for four hours before the exam. Avoid wearing clothes and/or jewelry with metal in the area being scanned. Please alert the nurse/tech of all medications you are taking. 

HOW TO PREP FOR A CT ABDOMEN AND/OR PELVIS WITH ORAL CONTRAST:
Do not eat anything for four hours prior to exam. Please call our office to receive preparation instructions.

Catscan2


Mammography

A mammogram is an x-ray exam of the breast that’s used to detect and evaluate breast changes. X-rays were first used to examine breast tissue nearly a century ago, by the German surgeon, Albert Salomon. But modern mammography has only existed since the late 1960s, when special x-ray machines were designed and used just for breast imaging. Since then, the technology has advanced a lot, and today’s mammogram is very different even from those of the 1980s and 1990s. Today, the x-ray machines used for mammograms produce lower energy x-rays. These x-rays do not go through tissue as easily as those used for routine chest x-rays or x-rays of the arms or legs, and this improves the image quality. Mammograms today expose the breast to much less radiation compared with those in the past.

HOW TO PREP FOR A MAMMOGRAPHY:
Do not use perfume, powder, lotion or deodorant on the day of the exam. Refrain from caffeine the day of the appointment. Please bring any previous mammograms and/or breast sonogram films with you.

mammography


Dexa

DEXA (Bone Density) is a means of measuring bone mineral density (BMD). Two X-ray beams with different energy levels are aimed at the patient's bones. When soft tissue absorption is subtracted out, the BMD can be determined from the absorption of each beam by bone. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry is the most widely used and most thoroughly studied bone density measurement technology. The DXA scan is typically used to diagnose and follow osteoporosis, as contrasted to the nuclear bone scan, which is sensitive to certain metabolic diseases of bones in which bones are attempting to heal from infections, fractures, or tumors.

HOW TO PREP FOR A BONE DENSITY (DEXA):
Wear clothing that does not contain metal fasteners. Patient cannot have any oral or IV contrast in their body for one week prior to your exam.


Ultrasound Guided Biopsy

An ultrasound-guided biopsy may be done to evaluate abnormal findings on another type of scan, or during a physical exam. To determine whether someone has cancer, a biopsy must be done. Tissue and fluid from the abnormal area are removed and examined under a microscope.

HOW TO PREP FOR AN ABDOMINAL SONOGRAM:
Do not eat or drink anything 6 hours prior to exam. 

 

ultrasound


Stereotactic Guided Biopsy

This test may be done if your doctor suspects cancer due to abnormal findings on a mammogram or ultrasound of the breast, or during a physical exam. To identify whether someone has breast cancer, a biopsy must be done. Tissue and fluid from the abnormal area are removed and examined with a microscope. Stereotactic breast biopsy is often used when a small growth or calcifications are seen on a mammogram, but cannot be seen using an ultrasound of the breast.


MRI Guided Biopsy

This type of core needle biopsy is done under guidance of MRI - an imaging technique that captures multiple cross-sectional images of your breast and combines them, using a computer, to generate detailed 3-D pictures. During this procedure, you lie face down on a padded scanning table. Your breasts fit into a hollow depression in the table.


SudoScan

SUDOSCAN is a new test that provides an accurate evaluation of sweat gland function through galvanic skin response in less than 3 minutes. SUDOSCAN measures the ability of the sweat glands to release chloride ions in response to an electrochemical activation on the palm of the hands and soles of the feet, areas with the highest sweat gland density. It is a dynamic test equivalent to a stress test in cardiology.


Echo Stress Test

A stress echocardiogram is a non-invasive test that combines two tests--a treadmill stress test (TST) and an echocardiogram (ECHO). This test is used to see how the heart muscle contracts during rest and during exercise. A stress echo is made up of three parts: a resting echo study, a stress test, and a repeat echo while the heart is beating fast.


BRCA Genetic Testing

Genetic tests can check for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in people with a family history of cancer that suggests the possible presence of a harmful mutation in one of these genes.


EKG

An electrocardiogram (EKG or ECG) is a test that checks for problems with the electrical activity of your heart. An EKG translates the heart's electrical activity into line tracings on paper. The spikes and dips in the line tracings are called waves. See a picture of the EKG components and intervals.

 

XRAY

xray